Pipeline Emergency: Call 1-888-876-0036

FAQ

Who is Explorer Pipeline?

Explorer Pipeline is a common carrier pipeline transportation company who operates a 1,830-mile system transporting refined petroleum products from the Gulf Coast through the Midwest. With connections to other refined petroleum products pipelines, we serve more than 70 major cities in 16 states. Explorer does not buy or sell petroleum products, it only provides transportation services.

What does Explorer transport?

Explorer Pipeline transports gasoline, fuel oil, jet fuel and other products including refinery feedstocks and diluent.

How does Explorer transport products?

Explorer’s 1,830-mile system begins with a 28 inch pipeline in Port Arthur, Texas then runs through Houston, Texas and on to Tulsa, Oklahoma. At Tulsa the line becomes a 24 inch pipeline and runs through St. Louis, Missouri on its way to the Chicago suburb of Hammond, Indiana. Our capacity is augmented with a 10-inch pipeline which stretches between Houston and Arlington, Texas along with many lateral lines for connections to delivery points throughout the system.

What areas does Explorer serve?

Through connections with other refined petroleum products pipelines, we serve more than 70 major cities in 16 states. Explorer is based in Tulsa, Oklahoma and also serves Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth, St. Louis and Chicago.

What is Explorer’s safety record?

Safety is our number one value. Explorer is known for its high safety standards and others are taking notice. The National Safety Council and the American Petroleum Institute have recognized the company with safety awards including API’s Occupational Safety Performance Award. Statistics from the National Transportation Safety Board and the U.S. Department of Transportation state pipelines are the safest and most reliable mode of transportation for our energy needs in the United States. However, digging around a high pressure pipeline without making the necessary 811 calls and taking the needed safety precautions can be hazardous to the environment and dangerous, up to and including loss of life.

What measures does Explorer take to ensure the integrity of its pipeline?

To ensure safe operations, Explorer employs a comprehensive integrity management plan to keep our pipeline running safely. We constantly monitor the pipeline through field inspection, aircraft patrols and 24-hour observation from the control center in Tulsa. Explorer regularly inspects the line from the inside using technology that detects signs of corrosion and mechanical damage before a problem occurs.

What do pipeline markers mean?

Pipeline markers are located along the pipeline right-of-way including fence lines, roads, railroad crossings and at all above-ground facilities. Pipeline markers identify the general location of the pipeline, the type of products transported, the operator’s name and the emergency contact number. Pipeline markers do not identify the exact location of the pipeline, nor do they indicate the pipeline’s current depth. Do not disturb the markers. Willful removal or damage of the markers is a federal offense and subject to a fine and imprisonment.

Who owns Explorer?

With headquarters in Tulsa, Explorer is owned by subsidiaries of Phillips66, Marathon, Sunoco and Shell.

What should I do if a pipeline runs across my land?

Never guess where a pipeline is located or how deep it is below the surface of the ground. Even if you know the general location of the pipeline, the ground above the pipeline may have changed due to erosion or grading. Call 811 to reach the State One Call Center before digging or excavating on your property and the operators will identify the exact location of all the underground utilities and pipelines. It’s the law. Periodically, you will receive a brochure in the mail containing valuable personal safety and pipeline safety information. Please take the time to read this brochure thoroughly and share the information with your family.

What should I do if a pipeline is near my house?

Residents and business owners along the pipeline right-of-way are encouraged to familiarize themselves with the pipeline’s path. Pipeline markers are easy to spot—just look for the white poles with the black top, or round yellow signs with black lettering located along the pipeline. The line markers identify the general location of the pipeline, the type of products transported, the operator’s name and the emergency contact number. Periodically, you will receive a brochure in the mail containing valuable personal safety and pipeline safety information. Please take the time to read this brochure thoroughly and share the information with your family or employees. In addition, the federal government provides access to maps that show the approximate location of transmission pipelines in your community. To view the maps, visit the online National Pipeline Mapping System. Call 811 to reach the State One Call Center before digging or excavating on your property and the operators will identify the exact location of all the underground utilities and pipelines. It’s the law.

Who should I call if I think a pipeline has ruptured?

If you suspect a pipeline may have a leak, leave the area immediately. Once you are at a safe distance away from the potential leak, call 911 first and then call Explorer’s emergency number at 888-876-0036.

Guidelines for responding to pipeline leaks:

  • Leave the area immediately going upwind and warn others to stay away
  • Do not light a match, start an engine, use a cell phone until a safe distance away, turn on or off any electrical appliances or do anything to make a spark.
  • Do not drive into an area where you suspect a leak and do not touch or operate pipeline valves

How will I know if a pipeline is leaking?

How do you detect a pipeline leak?
NOTE: All of these signs may not occur at the same time.

Look

  • A pool of liquid on or spraying from the ground
  • Discolored or dead vegetation
  • A rainbow sheen on water or in a flooded area
  • Continuous bubbling in water
  • Dirt or liquid being blown into the air
  • Flames coming from the ground or an exposed pipeline valve

Listen

  • An unusual hissing or roaring noise coming from a pipeline

Smell

  • An unusual odor such as gasoline, kerosene or other petroleum product

How safe are pipelines?

Each day, millions of miles of underground pipelines transport petroleum products across the United States to homes and businesses. Statistics from the National Transportation Safety Board and the U.S. Department of Transportation state pipelines are the safest and most reliable mode of transportation for our energy needs. However, digging around a high pressure pipeline without making the necessary 811 calls and taking the needed safety precautions can be hazardous to the environment and dangerous, up to and including loss of life.

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